Tag Archive - 2.0 leadership

1

what every team wants from their leader

Do you know what your team wants from you? Do you know what they need from you? In this 4-part series of articles below we’ll unpack the concepts and principles behind what every team is looking for from their leader. Want to be successful as a leader, then give your team what they’re asking for.

Part 1 1.0 Leadership vs. 2.0 Leadership

Peter Drucker once said that, “The leader of the past was a person who knew how to tell. The leader of the future will be a person who knows how to ask.” While there is a time and a place for an autocratic style of leadership, a younger generation entering the workforce is longing for more than just direction and dictatorship from their employer. This new generation entering the workplace is demanding 2.0 Leadership.

Part 2 Building a Culture

“I came to see, in my time at IBM, that culture isn’t just one aspect of the game—it is the game.” Lou Gerstner, former President & CEO of IBM. If it’s true that the culture of the church over time reflects the personality of the Senior Leader, than focusing on that first level of cultural transference from yourself to your Staff must be intentional and strategic.

Part 3 What is my Team asking of Me?

Through my experience of being on both sides of the desk, hiring, exiting, and leading a staff; there are 5 simple yet at the same time monumental questions that have continued to come up that are placed squarely on the shoulders of leadership to answer for the team.

Part 4 How to Train-Wreck your Team

Generally speaking people want to do a good job. Particularly when it comes to church world, your staff has submitted not only their soul to the Lord but their career as well. They are literally spending their lives for the sake of the Gospel. But your Staff is guaranteed to fail if as the Senior Leader you don’t provide them with the following…


Posted in Leadership, Staffing

0

“1.0 Leadership vs 2.0 Leadership” What every Staff member wants from their senior leader Part – 1

Peter Drucker once said that, “The leader of the past was a person who knew how to tell. The leader of the future will be a person who knows how to ask.” If he had the opportunity to express this concept in today’s language he may have chosen to phrase it like this, “There is a shift in leadership that is taking place from 1.0 Leadership to 2.0 Leadership.”

1.0 Leadership

Autocratic Leadership has been the commonly exercised style of leadership used by most businesses and even churches of the past. The Autocratic Leader is typically only interested in results, or the right answers that get them to the desired bottom line. They bark out orders and directions to their employees with the goal of maximizing the return on investment. Their interest in their employees has more to do with their productivity and what they can contribute to the organization than it has to do with the employee themselves.

2.0 Leadership

Collaborative Leadership by its very nature is an invitation to ownership and the development of the people in the organization. The Collaborative Leader is more interested in asking the right questions that drive the right conversations. They are skillful at bringing people along with them through engaging conversations and allowing them to come to the right answers. This leader is after buy-in, ownership, and the heart of their team. Collaborative Leaders invite their team to the table and are genuinely interested in relationships, developing and investing in their people, and engaging in dialogue that is not merely about getting greater productivity out of the work that is being accomplished, but also about the work itself.

While there is a time and a place for an autocratic style of leadership, a younger generation entering the workforce is longing for more than just direction and dictatorship from their employer. This new generation entering the workplace is demanding 2.0 Leadership. And while it’s true that each leader does have a style that comes most natural to them, the best leaders have the ability to assess the needs of the organization and its employees and then adapt by setting aside what may come natural to them. In essence setting aside their own preferences and natural inclinations for what is best for the needs of the organization and the team.


Posted in Leadership, Staffing