Tag Archive - cornerstone

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My Interview with 5 Sr. Pastors Leading Multisite Churches of 5,000+ Pt-1

I recently had the opportunity to sit down with 5 Phoenix Valley Pastors who are leading multiste churches that range in attendance from 5,000 to more than 15,000. In the next couple of days I’m going to be sharing some of their comments about Church Leadership. Here are the pastors who participated in the conversation:

Question #1 “How do young leaders earn the right to be heard and succeed on your team?”

Linn Winters: I think this may one of the biggest challenges in the church today. Older leaders need to learn how to embrace younger leaders and younger leaders need to stop fighting older leaders by trying to make their identity as different than older leaders instead of receiving a hand off from older leaders. Honor in public gives you influence in private. The most powerful thing a young leader can do to earn the right to be heard is they’ve got to learn how to support their leader publicly even if they disagree with them. Every older leader has got to figure out about the younger leaders on their team, are you Aaron or are you Absalom? You hear the story of Moses when Israel is fighting the Amalekites, and the battle goes by whether or not Moses’s arms are up. And if you think about it, that’s a horrible plan. Hey, we’re going to go fight, and the plan for winning is I’ll raise my arms. And I get it as young leaders that you say, “Sometimes I don’t know if I buy the plan of my older leader. I’m not sure if that’s how I would do it if I were king.” But that’s not the issue. The issue is honoring your leader. And Aaron knew this. When Moses’s arms get weak and tired, he helps to lift his arms. Because he knew that at the end of the day as the leader goes, so goes the church. And so they’re invested in the success of the leader, not for his sake, but for the sake of the nation. And young leaders need to learn to be invested in the success of their leader, not for his glory but for the greater glory of the church. And when you do this your leader is much more willing to hear the push-back and allow influence in private. Absalom does just the opposite. Absalom decides to sit at the city gate and criticize one of the greatest men of God ever. And David had his flaws. But Absalom decides to process every decision through the filter of “if I were King.” And the moment he does that he’s dissatisfied with his own father. And he spends his time trying to tear down his fathers Kingdom, to the harm of Israel. And at the end of the day if you’re going to be a young leader of influence you’ve got to decide, are you going to be an Aaron or are you going to be an Absalom? “Aarons” get heard; “Absaloms” get hung from trees by their hair.

Scott Ridout: The thing about leadership that most young leaders miss is that leadership isn’t appointed its acknowledged. When you’re a leader everyone knows it. And great leaders, young or old, play their position they don’t lead through our position.

Tyler Johnson: The reciprocal of this is true as well. As a leader the way you make your staff successful is a fundamental belief that my job is to help make them successful. Because the utmost example of somebody in power, Jesus who is God…Philippians 2 says: doesn’t count His position as something to be grasped but He humbles Himself and becomes obedient for the benefit of those other people. And I think that curve that you see theologically in Scripture, which in your dying for the benefit of somebody else, brings about resurrection. So a culture that is built upon servant leadership. I have a mentor who reminds me that, “Everyone talks about servant leadership but hardly anybody does it.” Because that death being at the center of love, your dying for somebody else’s gain is extraordinarily hard. And I think has application to both younger leaders and older leaders.

Don Wilson: I think the question, “What do young people need to do to be heard?” is the same thing older people need to do to be heard. I don’t think it’s an age issue. I think if you want to be heard first of all you need to have some results so they know you’re doing it. And secondly when you open your mouth to be heard, you’ve got to know what you’re talking about. And if you do that you’ll earn credibility whether you’re young or you’re old. If you get old and you can’t deliver or say the right thing you don’t have any influence either. You earn that by your servant attitude, your results, and then when you do speak you add something to the table. Probably the qualities I would say we look for…is one of the guys on our staff said, “There’s only two things you can control, your attitude and your effort.” And to me one of the greatest examples in business of attitude is Southwest Airlines. They hire for attitude. If we’re not careful, in the church I think sometimes we hire for skill and skill can plateau but if you have the right attitude you can always keep growing.

 


Posted in Leadership, Spiritual Formation, Staffing

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Join me at Ignite 2013

Ignite 2013 is right around the corner and early bird pricing ends in just a month! Ignite is intentionally designed for Church Planters, Planting Teams and Pastors who want to explore planting daughter churches or launching multi-site congregations.

You and your team will have opportunities to learn best practices from nationally recognized church planting leaders. I’ll be involved teaching a breakout session and interviewing Alan Hirsch in another. I’d love to connect with you, if you’re there come by and see me!

Dates & Location: March 5-7 at Cornerstone Christian Church in Phoenix, AZ

Cost: Early Bird Pricing ends January 1: $99/person or $79/per person for a group of 3+ from the same church. Click here to register!

Some of the Speakers:

Alan Hirsch
Alan Hirsch is the founding director of Forge Mission Training Network. Currently he co-leads Future Travelers, an innovative learning program helping megachurches become missional movements. Known for his innovative approach to mission, Alan is considered to be a thought-leader and key mission strategist for churches across the Western world. Alan is co-founder and adjunct faculty for the M.A. in Missional Church Movements at Wheaton College in Illinois. He is also adjunct professor at Fuller Seminary, George Fox Seminary, among others, and he lectures frequently throughout Australia, Europe, and the United States. He is series editor for Baker Books’ Shapevine series , IVP’s Forge line, and a contributing editor of Leadership Journal.

 

Ed Stetzer
Ed Stetzer has trained pastors and church planters on five continents, holds two masters degrees and two doctorates, and has written dozens of articles and books. Ed is a contributing editor for Christianity Today, a columnist for Outreach Magazine and Catalyst Monthly, serves on the advisory council of Sermon Central and Christianity Today’s Building Church Leaders, and is frequently cited or interviewed in news outlets such as USAToday and CNN. Ed is Visiting Professor of Research and Missiology at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Visiting Research Professor at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, and has taught at fifteen other colleges and seminaries. He also serves as Pastor of Grace Church in Hendersonville, Tennessee.


Chan Kilgore
Chan Kilgore is the Lead Pastor of CrossPointe Church in Orlando, FL, a church he planted in 2002. In addition to his pastoral duties at CrossPointe, he serves as the Florida Regional Leader for Acts 29, a church planting network. Chan is grateful for the partnership CrossPointe has with Converge Worldwide. On a personal note, he has been married for over 20 years to wife Stacy and is the proud father of 3 girls.


Posted in Leadership

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big move to the atl

I can remember as a young teenager going to bed praying and weeping night after night, begging God for the opportunity to influence thousands of people for Him. From the time before those prayers were ever uttered until today, God has been shaping me, forming me through His Word, His People, His Spirit, and His Wisdom for this very moment. For this moment, this community of people, this church, this mission…this is what I was made for.

Cornerstone, I could not do what the Lord has placed in front of me to do without you. What the Lord has done in my life through you and during my time among you will be treasured. I’m honored to have served along side of you and will take with me the many friendships, memories, and incredible moments that we’ve shared together. Thank you for your kind words in this moment. They have breathed affirmation, empowerment, courage and life into me and I am grateful.

North Metro, I cannot tell you how honored, humbled and excited Lisa and I are to be a part of what God is doing among you. You have already embraced us through emails, phone messages, and direct messages and it is so good to feel your love and affirmation, even from across the country. I cannot wait to get there this summer and get into the thick of life with you, and what the Lord has in store for us together.

While there is so much that could be said about how the Lord moved each step of the way in this process of calling us to North Metro and bending our hearts towards one another; I’ll simply say out loud to the Lord thank you for Your kindness and both shaping in us and leading us to what You know is best.

In order to finish well where I currently am, my family and I won’t I won’t be making the move to North Metro until later this summer. So as a result, we decided to have a video put together to introduce ourselves to our new church family! Below is the video that was shown this weekend at North Metro, happy viewing!

BTW got to give a big shout out to Chris Loope for doing the video work, the guy is simply amazing!

 


Posted in Creative Arts, Family, Leadership, Staffing

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The Younger Brother

This past week we kicked off a new series that found its roots in a book called “The Prodigal God,” written by Timothy Keller. This talk is the first in a series of three leading us up to Easter. Together we tackled the question of why we run from the Father and wrestled with irony that we so often find ourselves running from the very thing that our souls long for. So, what is it going to take for us to come to our senses? How long and how far are we willing to run until we wake up and realize that we were made to be at home with the Father?


Posted in Creative Arts, Spiritual Formation

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9 practical steps you can take to teach your children that life is not all about them

This past Sunday in the middle of almost 3,000 people from Cornerstone serving all over our community, my family made their way over to a hangar with about 500 other people to be a part of packing over 140,000 meals that are shipping to Haiti right now. We tossed Lincoln (our 2 year old) on my back in one of those hiking back deals for kids and Lisa, Kennedy, Mia, and I started cranking out the meals. The moment absolutely melted my heart as a dad, because it provided a brief snapshot of what could be. I mean just think, my kids might actually grow up thinking that it is normal to serve God and put other people first in life. That’s something I can get a little excited about.

If you’re a parent you know that teaching your children that life is not all about them and building a culture of servanthood in your family is no easy task. Kids naturally think that life is all about them, and by the way, most adults that I’ve met do too. This innate idea gets reinforced by the messages they receive in our culture through media, advertising, sports, and education among other things. Not to mention that most of us lead our families in a child centric fashion.

So in an effort to change the trajectory of our families, below are a handful of ideas and practical steps that we can take to integrate an attitude of service into our families. And who knows, we might be surprised by what could happen if we simply live an others oriented life and invite our children into that.

Continue Reading…


Posted in Family, Spiritual Formation, Volunteers
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