Tag Archive - ethic

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10 Things that Require Zero Talent

“Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard”

That’s a statement I talk to my son about all the time. He’s only 9 years old, but I want him to grow up to have a great work ethic and a positive attitude. I don’t expect him to be the great at everything he attempts, but I do expect him to give a great effort. There’s a lot of things he can’t control in life, but he’ll always be able to control his effort and his attitude.

This advice has greater implications than just a father to a son. There are some huge church leadership implications to this. In fact, the other day when I was working with a client that the Unstuck Group is coaching through a church merger I saw a note posted on the door of one of the staff members that was so good, I thought I’d share it with you. It was a list of 10 things that require zero talent…

#1 Being on Time: My girls learned this simple lesson when they were learning the game of golf when they were little. If you’re early you’re on time, if you’re on time you’re late, and if you’re late your disqualified. Great advice that works in golf and in life.

#2 Work Ethic: You may not be the boss and have the ability to control what kind of work you get assigned but you can control how you go about your work.

#3 Effort: You may not be great at it…but try hard anyway.

#4 Body Language: You say more with your body language than the words that actually come out of your mouth.

#5 Energy: You choose your energy level.

#6 Attitude: Your attitude is a choice and no one can fix it but you.

#7 Focus: You move towards what you focus on and you get to choose what gets your attention.

#8 Being Coachable: You can learn from anyone, but you have to choose to.

#9 Doing Extra: If someone asks you to go a mile and you do it they might remember that. But if you go the extra mile it’ll make a lasting impression.

#10 Being Prepared: When your opportunity comes along it’s too late to get ready and prepare yourself. Start preparing today for the opportunity that will come your way tomorrow.


Posted in Leadership

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How to Manage the Tension between Work and Rest

In the beginning, even before the fall of mankind, God created both work and rest (you can check out Genesis 1-3 for all the details). Both were helpful, both were holy, and both were enjoyed by and benefited man. After the fall of mankind everything was messed up, including mankind’s ideas and inclinations about work and rest. This tension still plagues us today, including church leaders. Our tendency in different seasons of leadership is to lean into one or the other more than we are designed to. And if not caught early it can do damage to our souls and ultimately the ministries that we are charged with leading.

Work

  • Personal ambition: When our ambition for growth as church leaders surpasses our ambition for God, there’s a problem.
  • High Expectations: When fast-charging and high-driving church leaders have set their vision and expectations higher for themselves and their ministries than God does, there’s a problem.
  • Selfish Gain: When we become consumed by our work and our identity as church leaders becomes rooted in our work rather than in God, there’s a problem.

Rest

  • Discouragement: When church leaders fall into discouragement and shrink back because things aren’t going the way they think they should be going, there’s a problem.
  • Emotional Weight: When church leaders pick up and begin to carry the emotional weight of the team, the outcomes of the vision, and the expectations of people in the church, there’s a problem.
  • Laziness: When church leaders over spiritualize the concepts of faith and dependency upon the Holy Spirit to work and avoid working hard themselves, there’s a problem.

When our hearts call too much for one or the other, something is off in us. We’ve been chasing after something that we were never intended to pursue. It should be an indicator to us that it’s time to return to the mission and return to God.

Photo Credit: CyboRoZ via Compfight cc


Posted in Leadership, Spiritual Formation