Tag Archive - leaders

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10 Articles that will Help Your Church Make Vision Real

Thank you for making August another great month here at Helping Churches Make Vision Real! It’s great staying connected with you through social media and hearing that these articles have been helpful. So, thank you for connecting with me through the content on this blog! You made these the top posts from this last month. If you missed out on any of them, here they are all in one place for your convenience!

10 Insider Focused Ministry Names

The language we choose to use is important because it both reflects and builds culture at the same time. And one of the most obvious ways to tell if a church is insider focused or outsider focused is the language that they choose to use. It either says that the church is “inclusive” or “exclusive.”

Why People Volunteer at Some Churches But Not at Others

Ever notice that a lot of churches feel like a spectator sport? You know, the kind of place where people sit around watching the paid staff do everything. The average church in America engages around 45% of their average adult and student attendance in some kind of volunteer role (check out the Unstuck Group Health Assessment for more info like this). But there are those churches that are above average. The top 10% of churches somehow seem to break all the normal statistics and engage more than 70% of their average adult and student attendance in some kind of volunteer role. Here are a couple of things they do different.

How Many People Should your Church have on Staff?

Before you buy into the idea that you need another staff person at your church, think again. That just may be the worst decision you make at your church this year.

Leadership Summit 2016: Bill Hybels

If you missed the Willow Creek Global Leadership Summit this year, no worries I’ve got you covered. I’ll be posting my notes and thoughts from each presenter over the next couple of days. Willow Creek Community Church Founder and Senior Pastor Bill Hybels opened the Summit addressing The 4 Lenses of Leadership.  The following are leadership quotes and lessons from this incredible session.

My Top-10 Church Leadership Posts of All-Time

I’m about to drop a secret on you about my blog. What keeps me going week in and week out is my personal discipline to continue to grow as a leader. This site acts as an accountability tool to keep me consistently thinking about, writing about, and testing my leadership thoughts and ideas. I don’t keep doing this for a platform, I keep doing this because I want to keep growing, so in essence you, the reader, get to have a sneak peak each week into my online, public, leadership journal. Over the years some posts have been more useful than others to readers. So I thought I’d share some of the most helpful articles over the last 6+ years with you. Happy reading!

The Art of Execution

Highlights from a leadership talk by Chad Moore, who serves as the Lead Pastor at Sun Valley, about bridging the gap between vision and reality. The art of execution. Here are some of the best highlights.

8 Reasons Why People Don’t Volunteer at your Church

’ve never worked with a church that has said they don’t need more volunteers. But I’ve worked with a bunch of churches that have trouble getting people to volunteer and stay engaged volunteering.

How to Change the Results at your Church Before they Happen

Churches measure what happened all the time. We measure what the attendance at last week’s worship services was, we measure what the offering was, we measure how many people were in groups last week, how many people served last week, and so on the list goes. The tough thing is you can’t change what just happened at your church last week. Most of the key metrics we look at are all about what has already happened. But what if there were things that we could measure that were indicators of future performance?

10 Signs your Church is Headed for Decline

What if there were early warning signs (flashing lights on the dashboard) that helped indicate that trouble was ahead? In my experience Coaching Church Leaders and Consulting with Churches across the country I’ve seen the following 10 indicators of an impending decline over and over again.

4 Bad Habits that Young Church Leaders Need to Break

Before you read this, please understand that I love and am for young leaders. After all, I was one once. But there are some really bad habits that young church leaders are exhibiting that need to be broken if they have any hope or chance of having the deep and broad Kingdom impact that they’re dreaming of.

Photo Credit: justin fain via Compfight cc


Posted in Leadership, Staffing

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My Interview with 5 Sr. Pastors Leading Multisite Churches of 5,000+ Pt-1

I recently had the opportunity to sit down with 5 Phoenix Valley Pastors who are leading multiste churches that range in attendance from 5,000 to more than 15,000. In the next couple of days I’m going to be sharing some of their comments about Church Leadership. Here are the pastors who participated in the conversation:

Question #1 “How do young leaders earn the right to be heard and succeed on your team?”

Linn Winters: I think this may one of the biggest challenges in the church today. Older leaders need to learn how to embrace younger leaders and younger leaders need to stop fighting older leaders by trying to make their identity as different than older leaders instead of receiving a hand off from older leaders. Honor in public gives you influence in private. The most powerful thing a young leader can do to earn the right to be heard is they’ve got to learn how to support their leader publicly even if they disagree with them. Every older leader has got to figure out about the younger leaders on their team, are you Aaron or are you Absalom? You hear the story of Moses when Israel is fighting the Amalekites, and the battle goes by whether or not Moses’s arms are up. And if you think about it, that’s a horrible plan. Hey, we’re going to go fight, and the plan for winning is I’ll raise my arms. And I get it as young leaders that you say, “Sometimes I don’t know if I buy the plan of my older leader. I’m not sure if that’s how I would do it if I were king.” But that’s not the issue. The issue is honoring your leader. And Aaron knew this. When Moses’s arms get weak and tired, he helps to lift his arms. Because he knew that at the end of the day as the leader goes, so goes the church. And so they’re invested in the success of the leader, not for his sake, but for the sake of the nation. And young leaders need to learn to be invested in the success of their leader, not for his glory but for the greater glory of the church. And when you do this your leader is much more willing to hear the push-back and allow influence in private. Absalom does just the opposite. Absalom decides to sit at the city gate and criticize one of the greatest men of God ever. And David had his flaws. But Absalom decides to process every decision through the filter of “if I were King.” And the moment he does that he’s dissatisfied with his own father. And he spends his time trying to tear down his fathers Kingdom, to the harm of Israel. And at the end of the day if you’re going to be a young leader of influence you’ve got to decide, are you going to be an Aaron or are you going to be an Absalom? “Aarons” get heard; “Absaloms” get hung from trees by their hair.

Scott Ridout: The thing about leadership that most young leaders miss is that leadership isn’t appointed its acknowledged. When you’re a leader everyone knows it. And great leaders, young or old, play their position they don’t lead through our position.

Tyler Johnson: The reciprocal of this is true as well. As a leader the way you make your staff successful is a fundamental belief that my job is to help make them successful. Because the utmost example of somebody in power, Jesus who is God…Philippians 2 says: doesn’t count His position as something to be grasped but He humbles Himself and becomes obedient for the benefit of those other people. And I think that curve that you see theologically in Scripture, which in your dying for the benefit of somebody else, brings about resurrection. So a culture that is built upon servant leadership. I have a mentor who reminds me that, “Everyone talks about servant leadership but hardly anybody does it.” Because that death being at the center of love, your dying for somebody else’s gain is extraordinarily hard. And I think has application to both younger leaders and older leaders.

Don Wilson: I think the question, “What do young people need to do to be heard?” is the same thing older people need to do to be heard. I don’t think it’s an age issue. I think if you want to be heard first of all you need to have some results so they know you’re doing it. And secondly when you open your mouth to be heard, you’ve got to know what you’re talking about. And if you do that you’ll earn credibility whether you’re young or you’re old. If you get old and you can’t deliver or say the right thing you don’t have any influence either. You earn that by your servant attitude, your results, and then when you do speak you add something to the table. Probably the qualities I would say we look for…is one of the guys on our staff said, “There’s only two things you can control, your attitude and your effort.” And to me one of the greatest examples in business of attitude is Southwest Airlines. They hire for attitude. If we’re not careful, in the church I think sometimes we hire for skill and skill can plateau but if you have the right attitude you can always keep growing.

 


Posted in Leadership, Spiritual Formation, Staffing